Friday, 16 January 2015

The Hawkesbury River - the Rhine of Australia

One of Britain's most popular nineteenth century authors, Anthony Trollope 1815-1882, wrote in 1873, the following, comparing the Hawkesbury River to other grander rivers found elsewhere around the landscape.


The Hawkesbury River has neither castles or islands, nor has it bright clear water like the Rhine 
but the headlands are higher, the bluffs are bolder, and the turns and manoeuvres of the 
course which the waters have made themselves, are grander, and to me more enchanting 
than those of either the European or American River.

Riverscape scene near Wisemans Ferry on the Hawkesbury River NSW, 1880-1909. One of a series of photographs probably taken on the Hawkesbury River by William Frederick Hall between 1880 and 1909.
From the collection of the Australian National Maritime Museum, viewed on Flickr 

Trollope was visiting his son Frederick who was living at the time in Grenfell NSW, he then travelled extensively around the countryside. He went by boat from Sackville past Wisemans Ferry and onto Sydney, accompanied by a number of politicians including the then Premier of NSW, Sir James Martin. Trollope was very impressed by the Hawkesbury as a destination and compared it favourably to the Rhine in Europe. He took copious notes and he published several books following the trip including his travels in a publication titled 'Australia and New Zealand' in 1873.

Title page of Australia and New Zealand published in 2 volumes


Trollope Reach, located just past Wisemans Ferry on the Hawkesbury River, was named in his memory. Trollope passed away 6 December 1882 in London and is buried at Kensal Green. He wrote over 50 publications, most of which can be viewed for free online at eBooks@Adelaide

2 comments:

  1. Every time we drive down the hill on the Freeway and cross the Hawkesbury I am impressed by its beauty.

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